ACOG Committee Opinion: Screening for Vitamin D Not Recommended

July 24, 2011

Routine screening of pregnant women for vitamin D deficiency is not recommended, according to a new Committee Opinion of The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Although severe vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy has been linked with abnormal skeletal development, congenital rickets, and bone fractures in newborns, most pregnant women obtain enough vitamin D through prenatal vitamins, fortified milk and juice, fish oils, and sunlight exposure.

Routine screening of pregnant women for vitamin D deficiency is not recommended, according to a new Committee Opinion of The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.1 Although severe vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy has been linked with abnormal skeletal development, congenital rickets, and bone fractures in newborns, most pregnant women obtain enough vitamin D through prenatal vitamins, fortified milk and juice, fish oils, and sunlight exposure.

Until new data show otherwise, only women thought to be at increased risk for vitamin D deficiency should be screened. These include women who are vegetarians, women who have limited exposure to sunlight, and women with darker skin tones. Supplementation with 1000 to 2000 IUs of vitamin D per day is generally accepted as being safe for pregnant women who are clinically deficient in vitamin D.

More Information

Do low vitamin D levels matter during pregnancy?Journal of Perinatology – Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy: safety considerations in the design and interpretation of clinical trials

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References:

Reference
1. Committee opinion no. 495: vitamin D screening and supplementation during pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2011;118:197-198.