American Society of Reproductive Medicine meeting: Younger women with diminished ovarian reserve can still get pregnant

January 1, 2010

Forty percent of women 35 years old or younger with a diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) could conceive with fertility treatments, fertility clinic research shows.

Forty percent of women 35 years old or younger with a diagnosis of diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) were able to conceive with fertility treatments, according to a retrospective chart review of patients presenting to a fertility clinic.

"Care providers can offer some reassurance to this patient population that they have a reasonable chance of conceiving," said Kriston Ward, MS, RN, CNP, nurse practitioner at Strong Fertility Center in Rochester, New York, and the study's lead investigator. "They therefore may decide to go forward with fertility treatments."

As expected, the study found that women older than 35 years with a diagnosis of DOR did not fare as well.

Overall, 21 of the 52 women (40%) aged 35 years or younger had a successful pregnancy outcome. Pregnancy rates were 22% with clomiphene citrate-treated cycles, 69% with the use of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) during cycles, and 6% with natural cycles. Contrary to the published literature, the rate of miscarriage was not high, Ward said. Only 2 women (4%) aged 35 years or younger had loss of pregnancy.

Forty-six of the 201 women (23%) older than 35 years had a successful pregnancy outcome. Loss of pregnancy occurred in 20 women (10%). Pregnancy rates were 39% with clomiphene cycles, 58% with FSH cycles, and 3% with natural cycles.

"A diagnosis of DOR is a pretty hard diagnosis for younger women. I did the study so that I could tell them that even though you have this diagnosis, your chances of conceiving are still pretty good, especially when compared to their older counterparts, and I have the data to support that statement," said Ward. "Putting it into perspective, you have this diagnosis but your age is working for you."