ASRM finds preimplantation genetic screening inappropriate

Jan 01, 2008

ASRM has concluded that the available evidence does not support the use of preimplantation genetic screening in an effort to bolster live-birth rates in women with advanced maternal age, previous implantation failure, or recurrent pregnancy loss. . .

The American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) has concluded that the available evidence does not support the use of preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) in an effort to bolster live-birth rates in women with advanced maternal age, previous implantation failure, or recurrent pregnancy loss, or to reduce the miscarriage rate in women with aneuploidy-related recurrent pregnancy loss.

PGS involves testing for chromosomal abnormalities one or more cells from embryos created via in vitro fertilization for parents with no known genetic abnormality.

ASRM believes preimplantation genetic diagnosis, however, for people who know they are at risk of transmitting a genetic disease or chromosomal abnormality to their children, represents a major scientific breakthrough.