CDC launches new campaign to test pregnant women for HIV

August 1, 2007

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants obstetric providers to encourage women to get tested for HIV early in their pregnancy. To that end, the CDC has launched a new program called "One Test.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention wants obstetric providers to encourage women to get tested for HIV early in their pregnancy. To that end, the CDC has launched a new program called "One Test. Two Lives." The program offers screening recommendations from the CDC, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, and the American College of Nurse-Midwives; educational material for patients; and tips for managing patients who are unsure about HIV testing.

Obstetricians are a key target of the campaign because research has shown that pregnant women are much more likely to accept HIV screening if their health-care provider strongly recommends it. Moreover, while HIV screening early in the pregnancy is best, it is never too late to test for the virus. According to the CDC, the "Mother-Infant Rapid Intervention at Delivery" study shows that HIV rapid testing can be performed during labor and antiretroviral interventions can be quickly delivered to HIV-infected mothers and infants with good results.

To learn more about the campaign or to order materials free of charge, visit the "One Test. Two Lives." Web site at http://www.cdc.gov/1test2lives.