HCP Live
Contagion LiveCGT LiveNeurology LiveHCP LiveOncology LiveContemporary PediatricsContemporary OBGYNEndocrinology NetworkPractical CardiologyRheumatology Netowrk

Cholesterol levels and drugs don't alter breast cancer risk

Although there's some evidence to suggest that statins reduce the threat of breast cancer, a large, prospective cohort study has concluded that serum lipid levels and cholesterol-lowering drugs, including statins, do not seem to affect a woman's risk of breast cancer.

Although there's some evidence to suggest that statins reduce the threat of breast cancer, a large, prospective cohort study has concluded that serum lipid levels and cholesterol-lowering drugs, including statins, do not seem to affect a woman's risk of breast cancer.

Researchers followed almost 80,000 cancer-free women between the ages of 42 and 69 who participated in the Nurses' Health Study for up to 12 years. A total of 3,177 cases of invasive breast cancer were documented. The researchers found that current users of lipid-lowering drugs in general and users of statins in particular had a breast cancer risk similar to nonusers (multivariate RR, 0.99; 95% CI; 0.86–1.13 and RR 0.91; 95% CI; 0.76–1.08, respectively). They also found that women with self-reported serum cholesterol levels of ≥240 mg/dL were at no greater risk for breast cancer than women with levels <180 mg/dL (RR 1.04; 95% CI; 0.91–1.17). Duration of use was similarly unassociated with risk.

Eliassen AH, Colditz GA, Rosner B, et al. Serum lipids, lipid-lowering drugs, and the risk of breast cancer. Arch Intern Med. 2005;165:2264-2271.