Consortium to address OB genetics best practices

February 13, 2020
Judith M. Orvos, ELS
Judith M. Orvos, ELS

Judith M. Orvos, ELS, is an editorial consultant for Contemporary OB/GYN.

Six medical societies have formed a new organization to enhance communication about genetics and pregnancy.

Six medical societies have formed a new organization to enhance communication about genetics and pregnancy. Called the Reproductive Genetics Technology Consortium (RGTC), the initiative is designed to facilitate translation of genetic technologies into clinical care.

Founding members of the consortium, which has developed a charter, are the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG), American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), International Society of Prenatal Diagnosis, National Society of Genetic Counselors, Perinatal Quality Foundation, and Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). Representatives of the organizations will meet regularly to facilitate discussion and/or consensus.

Among the aims of the consortium are expert review of the “state of the science,” advocacy for equitable access to genetic technologies, and development of consensus expert opinions about the clinical use and application of emerging genetic tests. It will also provide a forum through which commercial laboratories or other entities developing new technologies can proactively communicate to obtain input and guidance on new testing.

ASRM representative Aleks Rajkovic, MD, in a press release from that organization, noted that, “the bewildering array of preimplantation and prenatal genetic testing represents a challenge to many of our practitioners. It is important for member organizations to speak with a single voice where consensus is clear on best practices, technologies and products that will benefit our patients.” 

Commenting on the consortium in a press release from ACMG, President Anthony R. Gregg, MD, MBA, FACOG, FACMG said, “ACMG is confident that collaborations among the RGTC member organizations will ensure patients receive high quality are as innovative genetic technologies move from the laboratory to the bedside.”