COVID-19 disparities, policing and more

July 15, 2020

To date, COVID-19 continues to challenge public health infrastructure, out-pace hospital and physician capacity, make people ill, and kill on a global scale.

“Since early 2020, the US has been in the midst of a worldwide pandemic due to a deadly coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Physicians, per their oath, “leaned in” to serve on the front line, prevent further spread, and treat the sick. To date, COVID-19 continues to challenge public health infrastructure, out-pace hospital and physician capacity, make people ill, and kill on a global scale.

Much the same can be said about the not so novel racism virus. Its current and tragic toll upon generations of racial and ethnic minority Americans (eg, African Americans, Arab Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic and Latino Americans, and Native Americans and Pacific Islanders), continues to make our society sick, contributing to accelerated aging and premature morbidity and mortality.

Although the US was founded on “liberty and justice for all,” discrimination, racism, and xenophobia existed worldwide prior to the country’s birth and continues to persist. One can argue racism is a much deadlier, more virulent, and more pervasive disease than COVID-19.

Like crabgrass and thorny weeds in a beautiful perennial garden, both must be extinguished for the US to reach its full promise. Considering the changing demographics in the US: an increasingly minority, female, and aging society (ie, a minority majority society), it is our imperative to do so.”

For the full article, visit Psychiatric Times.