Endocrine-disrupting chemicals a public threat

September 1, 2009

Endocrine-disrupting chemicals are a significant concern to public health.

Differences in surgical management, in adjuvant therapy, and in patient populations seem to have no effect on the high 3-year survival and 3-year recurrence-free survival rates associated with preoperative grade 1 endometrial cancer.

Researchers from Duke University and Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center performed a retrospective analysis involving 494 women from the two institutions identified with preoperative, central-review–confirming, grade 1, endometroid, endometrial cancer.

While the two groups of women were similar in grade, final histology, type of hysterectomy, and length of hospital stay, the women from Sunnybrook were a few years older (aged 62 years compared with 59 years at Duke), were more than twice as likely as the women at Duke to have capillary lymphatic space involvement (18.2% vs. 8.3%, respectively), were more than three times as likely as the women at Duke to have cervical involvement (12.2% vs. 3.7%, respectively), were less likely than the women at Duke to have been operated on by a gynecologic oncologist (66% vs. 91%, respectively), and were three times more likely than their counterparts to receive adjuvant radiation treatment (20.7% vs. 7%, respectively).

Bernardini MQ, May T, Khalifa MA, et al. Evaluation of two management strategies for preoperative grade 1 endometrial cancer. Obstet Gynecol. 2009;114:7-15.