Laparoscopy is the least costly surgical option for endometrial cancer

November 1, 2010

Investigators at Duke University performed an analysis of laparoscopic, robotic, and open abdominal hysterectomy for treatment of endometrial cancer comparing the hospital-related and societal costs associated with each of these procedures.

Investigators at Duke University performed an analysis of laparoscopic, robotic, and open abdominal hysterectomy for treatment of endometrial cancer comparing the hospital-related and societal costs associated with each of these procedures. They found that laparoscopy is the least expensive surgical approach in both hospital and societal models. The analysis also showed that robotic is less costly than abdominal hysterectomy when the societal costs associated with recovery time are accounted for and that it also is the most economically attractive of the models if disposable equipment costs can be minimized.

The societal perspective model included costs associated with surgery, acquisition and maintenance of the robot, hospitalization, and lost wages and caregiver costs. One hospital model included the cost of purchasing a robot as well as all costs used in the societal model and excluded lost wages and caregiver costs. The second hospital model assumed prior ownership of the robot and excluded this cost.

In the societal model, laparoscopy, with an average cost of $10,128, was associated with a cost savings of $1,348 over robotic hysterectomy and $2,719 over open hysterectomy. In the hospital model that includes acquisition of a robot, laparoscopy, with a cost of $6,581, was $2,189 less than robotic hysterectomy and $428 less than open hysterectomy. In the hospital model without robot purchase costs, laparoscopic hysterectomy, with a cost of $6,581, represents a cost savings over robotic and open hysterectomy of $897 and $428, respectively.