More data linking hormones, sleep, and the perimenopause

Jan 01, 2006

If your perimenopausal patients are having trouble sleeping, they are not alone. Difficulty sleeping is reported by 29% more perimenopausal than premenopausal women and seems to be worst at the beginning and end of menstrual cycles.

If your perimenopausal patients are having trouble sleeping, they are not alone. Difficulty sleeping is reported by 29% more perimenopausal than premenopausal women and seems to be worst at the beginning and end of menstrual cycles.

Levels of pregnanediol glucuronide (PdG) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) may have something to do with it. Researchers calculated that the odds of sleep dysfunction increased 11.1% in the premenopausal group for each log-unit increment in FSH and increased 9.5% in the perimenopausal group for each log-unit increment in PdG level.

In terms of nonhormonal factors, mood and vasomotor symptoms were consistently and strongly associated with difficulty sleeping in both groups. Fewer sleep problems were reported during summer, as opposed to winter months. Premenopausal women with two or more medical conditions were more likely to have sleeping problems, and those taking pain medications were less likely to do so.