NSAIDs may reduce breast cancer risk, but...

December 1, 2008

Although NSAIDs are associated with risk reduction in breast cancer, the relationship is not a gradient-dose response.

Although non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are associated with risk reduction in breast cancer, the relationship is not a gradient-dose response where increasing dose confers a protective effect, researchers report in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Bahi Takkouche, MD, PhD, of the University of Santiago de Compostela in Spain, and colleagues performed a meta-analysis of data from 38 studies, involving 2,788,715 women, to examine the association between NSAIDs and breast cancer.

Overall, NSAIDs reduced the risk by 12%, when compared to non-users, the researchers found. Aspirin and ibuprofen reduced the threat by 13% and 21%, respectively. Increased intake, either increased total dose or longer duration, did not alter the risk reduction among NSAIDs, aspirin, or ibuprofen, the authors report.

Takkouche B, Regueira-Méndez C, Etminan M. Breast cancer and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: a meta-analysis. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2008;100:1439-1447. doi:10.1093/jnci/djn324.