Nuchal thickening alone not linked to adverse outcome if...

March 1, 2007

Children who had nuchal translucency thickening during the first trimester, but a normal karyotype and no structural abnormalities, are clinically and developmentally normal during the first 2 years of life, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Children who had nuchal translucency thickening during the first trimester, but a normal karyotype and no structural abnormalities, are clinically and developmentally normal during the first 2 years of life, according to a study in the January issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Yves Ville, MD, of the Paris-Ile-de-France-Ouest Medical School in Paris, France, and colleagues identified 248 fetuses with nuchal translucency in the 99th percentile or greater at 11 to 14 weeks' gestation. Long-term outcomes were examined in 160 children who were born alive. Outcomes were assessed by clinical examination and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire and compared with 370 term control children.

After 2 years, the researchers found no association between nuchal translucency thickness and clinical or developmental abnormalities, or any increase in the incidence of developmental delay.

Senat MV, Bussieres L, Couderc S, et al. Long-term outcome of children born after a first-trimester measurement of nuchal translucency at the 99th percentile or greater with normal karyotype: a prospective study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2007;196:53. e1-6.