Ovarian clock affected by hormonal signals

Article

Ovulation may be partly dependent on an ovarian circadian clock that is affected by hormonal signals from the pituitary.

Ovulation may be partly dependent on an ovarian circadian clock that is affected by hormonal signals from the pituitary, according to animal research published in the September issue of Endocrinology.

Tomoko Yoshikawa, of the Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine in Sapporo, Japan, and colleagues analyzed data from female Period1-luciferase (Per1-luc) transgenic rats. Researchers surgically denervated or heterotopically transplanted the ovaries within the animals with or without encapsulating them with dialysis membrane, then phase advanced or delayed the animals' light-dark cycles by 6 hours. They cultured the animals' ovaries during the next 12 days to assess the resetting of their ovarian clock.

Control ovaries had similar resetting trajectories as their surgically denervated or encapsulated counterparts, indicating that endocrine signals can sufficiently provide phase information to the ovary, the authors write. In granulosa cell cultures, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were associated with large phase shifts of Per1-luc on the following day.

Yoshikawa T, Sellix M, Pezuk P, et al. Timing of the ovarian circadian clock is regulated by gonadotropins. Endocrinology. 2009;150:4338-4347.

Related Videos
Addressing racial and ethnic disparities in brachial plexus birth Injury | Image Credit: shrinerschildrens.org
Innovations in prenatal care: Insights from ACOG 2024 | Image Credit:  uofmhealth.org.
Unlocking therapeutic strategies for menopausal cognitive decline | Image Credit: uclahealth.org.
Navigating menopause care: Expert insights from ACOG 2024 | Image Credit: mayo.edu.
raanan meyer, md
New data shows elinzanetant's efficacy in treating menopausal symptoms | Image Credit: uvahealth.com
Related Content
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.