Is this the picture of a diabetogenic diet?

April 1, 2005

It seems women may need to put down their burgers and fries if they want to reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

It seems women may need to put down their burgers and fries if they want to reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus.

A recent prospective study of almost 70,000 women between 38 and 63 years of age found that women who eat a typical Western diet, high in red and processed meats, sweets and desserts, french fries, and refined grains, are at higher risk for diabetes than women who eat a more prudent diet consisting of higher intakes of fruits, vegetables, legumes, fish, poultry, and whole grains. Women who relied the most on the typical Western diet were about 50% more likely to develop diabetes than those who eat the healthiest. (RR 1.49; 95% CI, 1.26-1.76; P for trend <0.001).

The researchers also found positive associations between type 2 diabetes and red and/or processed meats. The relative risk for diabetes for every one-serving increase in intake of red meat was 1.26 (95% CI, 1.21-1.42), for hot dogs it was 1.49 (95% CI, 1.04-2.11), and for bacon it was 1.73 (95% CI, 1.39-2.16).