Women's breast density linked to height during youth

Article

A girl's height in childhood and adolescence is associated with the density of her breasts as a mature woman, according to a report published in the Aug. 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

A girl's height in childhood and adolescence is associated with the density of her breasts as a mature woman, according to a report published in the Aug. 15 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Thomas A. Sellers, PhD, of the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer and Research Institute in Tampa, Fla., and colleagues examined data collected for the Minnesota Breast Cancer Family Study on 1,893 women who had not had breast cancer. Information on childhood height, weight, physical activity, and diet was self-reported by questionnaire.

Women who remember being taller than their peers at 7, 12, and 18 years had higher mean mammographic densities as adults. Women who remembered being heavier on average than their peers at the age of 12 had lower mean mammographic densities as adults. No overall association was observed between adult breast density and youth physical activity or diet.

Sellers TA, Vachon CM, Pankratz VS, et al. Association of childhood and adolescent anthropometric factors, physical activity, and diet with adult mammographic breast density. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;166:456-464.

Related Videos
Navigating vasomotor symptoms in breast cancer patients | Image Credit: menopausefoundationcanada.ca.
Fertility counseling for oncology patients | Image Credit: allhealthtv.com
Learning what women prefer in STI preventive care
The impact of smoking cessation on pregnancy outcomes | Image Credit: rwjmg.rwjms.rutgers.edu
USPSTF releases new recommendations for breast cancer screening | Image Credit: uclahealth.org
Maximizing maternal health: The impact of exercise during pregnancy | Image Credit: cedars-sinai.org
Understanding combined oral contraceptives and breast cancer risk | Image Credit: health.ucdavis.edu
Why doxycycline PEP lacks clinical data for STI prevention in women
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.