‘Tis the season for vaccination

Publication
Article
Contemporary OB/GYN JournalVol 67 No 09
Volume 67
Issue 09

From typical yearly vaccinations such as influenza and tetanus to SARS-CoV-2 and monkeypox vaccinations, over the past 3 years, it has become apparent how crucial vaccines are to our health and well-being.

From typical yearly vaccinations such as influenza and tetanus to SARS-CoV-2 and monkeypox vaccinations, over the past 3 years, it has become apparent how crucial vaccines are to our health and well-being.

With school starting back up and flu season right around the corner, now more than ever, we should be scheduling vaccination appointments for ourselves and our children to help stop the spread of various infectious diseases.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, pregnant women should receive the influenza vaccine and the tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine.1 The organization stresses that it is safe for women to receive most vaccines after giving birth and while breastfeeding.

However, some vaccines are not recommended during pregnancy, including the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine; measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine; live influenza (nasal flu) vaccine; and varicella (chicken pox) vaccine, as well as
some travel vaccines such as yellow fever, typhoid fever, and Japanese encephalitis, unless the benefits of the vaccines outweigh the risks, as determined by your health care provider.

For children, the following vaccinations are recommended by a majority of governments and physicians, according to UNICEF: Bacillus Calmette–Guérin for tuberculosis; hepatitis B vaccine; poliovirus vaccine; DTaP for diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis in younger age groups; Hib for Haemophilus influenza type b; pneumococcal for pneumococcal diseases; rotavirus; MMR; and HPV.2

Although, the benefits of vaccines have been scientifically proven to outweigh the risks through numerous studies, there is still skepticism and misinformation spread about vaccines throughout the world.

Despite this, health care providers should stay vigilant in educating and disseminating the benefits and correct information regarding vaccines to their patients. It is up to them, as well as national and international health organizations, to help fight the spread of vaccine misinformation through patient education and outreach to make the world a healthier and safer environment for everyone.

Mike Hennessy Jr

President and CEO, MJH Life Sciences®

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