Addressing Physician and Patient Myths Regarding Long Acting Reversible Contraception

May 11, 2018

VideoSeries

VideoSeries

 

Introduction:

Addressed by: Paula J. Adams Hillard, MD (Chair)

PATIENT MYTHS

Myth: My partner will be able to feel the IUD during sex

Addressed by: Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG

Myth: It’s too long of a time commitment

Addressed by: Melanie Ariane Gold, DO, DMQ

Myth: I will gain a lot of weight with an IUD

Addressed by: Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH

Myth: The IUD will be lost

Addressed by: Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG

Myth: I can still get pregnant even with an IUD

Addressed by: Melanie Ariane Gold, DO, DMQ

Myth: The LARC will get stuck

Addressed by: Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH

Myth: I am more likely to get an infection because of an IUD

Addressed by: Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG

PROVIDER MYTHS

Myth: I’m concerned about my patients developing pelvic inflammatory disease

Addressed by: Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG

Myth: I’m concerned about the future fertility of patients after we insert a LARC

Addressed by: Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH

Myth: I need to use misoprostol to prep the cervix for IUD insertion in nulliparous and adolescent women

Addressed by: Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH

Myth: The risk of perforation during IUD insertion is too great to justify its use

Addressed by: Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG

Myth: My patients need to wait at least six months after the insertion of a LARC before I can even consider removing it for any reason

Addressed by: Melanie Ariane Gold, DO, DMQ

Myth: My patient is simply uninterested in a LARC

Addressed by: Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH

Myth: Teens aren’t good candidates for IUDs

Addressed by: Melanie Ariane Gold, DO, DMQ

 

About the Speakers :

Paula J. Adams Hillard, MD

Paula J. Adams Hillard, MD, is professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Stanford University School of Medicine, California, where she serves as associate chair for medical student education. She also directs the program in pediatric and adolescent gynecology at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Hillard has been active on a number of national medical committees, including chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committees on patient education, adolescent health, and guidelines for women’s health. She is a past member of ACOG’s gynecologic practice committee and the gynecology document review committee, and is currently a member of the ethics committee. She is the author of more than 140 peer-reviewed articles and abstracts, and more than 100 book chapters on women’s health.

Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG

Katharine O’Connell White, MD, MPH, FACOG, is an assistant professor of obstetrics & gynecology at the Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts. Dr. White’s primary research interests include contraceptive decision-making, rapid repeat pregnancies, immediate postpartum intrauterine device (IUD) placement, and pain reduction with IUD placement.

Melanie Ariane Gold, DO, DMQ

Melanie Ariane Gold, DO, DMQ, is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Child and Adolescent Health, Section of Adolescent Medicine, at Columbia University Medical Center, and a professor in the Department of Population & Family Health at the Mailman School of Public Health, New York. She is also the Medical Director of New York-Presbyterian Hospital’s (NYPH) 7 school-based health centers (SBHCs). Dr. Gold is an osteopathic physician, a pediatrician, and an adolescent medicine subspecialist. She was the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Adolescent Health (SOAH) liaison to the ACOG committee on pediatric and adolescent health care from 2005 to 2007.

Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH

Stephanie Teal, MD, MPH, is a professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado. She also serves as the medical consultant for the Colorado Department of Public Health Family Planning Program, and as Medical Director of the Adolescent Family Planning Clinic at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Dr. Teal’s medical interests include new innovations in contraception, adolescent reproductive health and gynecology, and contraception for women with chronic medical conditions. Her research is focused on ambivalence toward pregnancy and its effect on contraception use, and adolescents and long-acting birth control methods.