Age of anxiety

October 1, 2020
Volume 65, Issue 10

The practitioner’s role is to care for others, but what happens when they are facing burnout and have no time to care for themselves?

It is a common theme we are hearing from physicians across the specialties we cover.

As the pandemic goes on, the issue of mental health has been coming to the forefront. In her editorial this month, Editor-in-Chief Catherine Y. Spong, MD, gives us a glimpse into her antepartum rounds and the number of women she is seeing who struggle with mental illness and substance abuse.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), national rates of anxiety have increased four-fold from one year ago. Why wouldn’t that be the case? Life as we know it has been upended. The ability to socialize and the feeling of community has changed, and economic and life stressors are compounded.

In caring for others during this time, physicians also must remember to know their own limits. Last month, we included an article on physician burnout. For ob/gyns, professional organizations such as the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) have additional resources.

There are numerous resources available. As Dr. Spong points out, one of her colleagues’ practices has biweekly meetings with a psychologist. These are trying times for everyone. Do not leave yourself out.

Let us know what you are doing for self-care, or what programs are being implemented at your institutions or hospital facilities by emailing Senior Editor Angie DeRosa at aderosa@mjhlifesciences.com.

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Mike Hennessy, Sr.

Chairman and Founder, MJH Life Sciences

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