Coffee Consumption Linked to Lower Stroke Risk in Women

March 29, 2011

Women who consume one or more cups of coffee daily have a lower risk of stroke than those who consume less than one cup of coffee a day, according to a study published online March 10 in Stroke.

FRIDAY, March 11 (HealthDay News) -- Women who consume one or more cups of coffee daily have a lower risk of stroke than those who consume less than one cup of coffee a day, according to a study published online March 10 in Stroke.

Susanna C. Larsson, Ph.D., from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues evaluated the association between coffee consumption and stroke incidence. Data from 34,670 women without history of cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline from the Swedish Mammography Cohort were included. A self-administered questionnaire at baseline (1997) assessed participant coffee consumption. Incident stroke cases were identified during an average follow-up of 10.4 years from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry.

The investigators found that coffee consumption significantly lowered the risk of total stroke, cerebral infarction, and subarachnoid hemorrhage, after adjusting for risk factors. There was no dose-response relationship between coffee consumption and risk of stoke. Women who drank one to two, three to four, or more than five cups of coffee per day had a significantly reduced risk of stroke compared with those who drank less than one cup per day. Smoking, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and diabetes or hypertension history did not modify this association between coffee consumption and cerebral infarction.

"In this population-based cohort of Swedish women, women who consumed one or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk of stroke compared with women who consumed less than one cup of coffee daily," the authors write.

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