Delaware Doctor Offers Revolutionary Approach To Common Women's Health & Fertility Problem

November 10, 2011

Benjamin Franklin's words "God helps those who help themselves" were echoed as a motivational battle cry by Medical Chair Dr. Ron Feinberg in a June 8 keynote address to an audience of 250 at the international conference of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Association.

NEWARK, Del., June 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Benjamin Franklin's words "God helps those who help themselves" were echoed as a motivational battle cry by Medical Chair Dr. Ron Feinberg in a June 8 keynote address to an audience of 250 at the international conference of the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Association. Participants in the June 7-10, 2001 gathering in Valley Forge, PA were primarily women affected with PCOS, as well as physicians, scientists, authors, and other health professionals who donated their time and expertise.

"The number of women with PCOS is staggering, now numbering in the millions," stated Dr. Feinberg, "and it has been disheartening for me to realize how few of these women truly understand what PCOS is all about. Every day, such women are struggling with heartbreaking problems -- infertility, miscarriage, obesity, and cosmetic nightmares unimaginable to most men. Most of these women suffer in silence, since they don't know where to turn for help."

In "Throwing the Book at PCOS," Dr. Feinberg stressed that the incidence of PCOS has risen dramatically in parallel with epidemics of Type II diabetes, obesity, and coronary artery disease, part of a metabolic cluster of insulin problems originally coined Syndrome X by Dr. Gerald Reaven. "There is a strong tendency to blame all of these problems on bad genes. But our genes have not changed very much over the last few thousand years. What has changed significantly is our environment, our food choices, and our predilection for a sedentary existence," implored Dr. Feinberg.

`Knowledge is Freedom' was the theme for this year's Conference. However, Dr. Feinberg believes that knowledge also implies personal responsibility, as well as the requirement that physicians educate and treat their patients properly. In the final part of his noontime address, Dr. Feinberg introduced Syndrome O -- an exciting new concept he described as "a slightly different way of looking at things."

Syndrome O -- Ovarian confusion, Ovulation disruption, and Over nourishment -- reflects a novel and important approach for teaching women how closely their metabolism and fertility are linked. "More importantly, we can systematically demonstrate how women can meet their own personal Syndrome O challenges. This is accomplished through the Syndrome O Survival (SOS) Strategies," stated Dr. Feinberg, who further outlined in his talk how one's personal lifestyle and treatments should be organized and optimized.

As fertility specialists and Board certified reproductive endocrinologists at Reproductive Associates of Delaware, Dr. Feinberg and colleague Dr. Barbara McGuirk have successfully helped their patients incorporate the SOS Strategies. "Although millions of women are affected with Syndrome O just in the United States, we now have the vital tools and knowledge to inspire a program of success," added public relations manager Lesa Childers.

The Conference had multiple corporate sponsors, including Bristol-Myers Squibb, Serono, and Ferring.