HCP Live
Contagion LiveCGT LiveNeurology LiveHCP LiveOncology LiveContemporary PediatricsContemporary OBGYN

Expert Perspectives on Contraception Options: Where Are We Today? - Episode 13

Educational Resources on Contraceptive Options

,

Experts in gynecology share practical resources for patients and providers on the currently available contraceptive options.

Thomas Kimble, MD: With counseling about birth control, a lot of the manufacturers will provide anatomic models. They'll provide display samples of the products, like IUDs, or the vaginal ring, or the implant, so that you can show patients, and they get a better feeling, and they're more comfortable about it. And then there are some websites that are good and reliable. I always tell my patients, "Dr Google failed out of medical school, so don't go to Dr Google." But there are some reliable ones. You've got your major organizations, like the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the Society of Family Planning, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, all have information that is more geared towards patients and women's health and reproductive health. And another really good website that I like to use all the time is Bedsider.org. That’s a source of reliable information for patients.

Jenna Beckham, MD, MSPH, FACOG: We're big fans of Bedsider.org around here. I think it's just an easier thing to remember than sending someone to ACOG or even Society for Family Planning.

Thomas Kimble, MD: Exactly.

Jenna Beckham, MD, MSPH, FACOG: It's an easier name to remember. And it has great visuals, great information, and different methods of patients who have different ways they like to learn, of either reading, looking at diagrams, watching little videos, so big fan of Bedsider.org. And for providers- and you mentioned having resident students, as do I- I love the CDC Medical Eligibility Criteria, the color chart. It's an easy thing to track. And that's a little bit more geared for providers in our counseling and thinking about medical conditions and risk factors. But the green, light red, dark red is an easy thing for our eyes to recognize in, deciding certain medical conditions when we take care of more complex patients and finding the right contraceptive method for them.

Thomas Kimble, MD: I agree. And I use it on a regular basis.

Transcript edited for clarity