Legal: Asherman's syndrome following D&C

January 1, 2009

Woman claims D&C was done too aggressively causing Asherman's syndrome.

An Illinois woman delivered vaginally in 2002. One week later she experienced severe, life-threatening bleeding, necessitating an emergency dilation and curettage. The woman sued the delivering obstetrician and claimed she was negligent in examining the placenta following delivery resulting in a retained placental fragment, which caused the bleeding. She also claimed that the D&C was done too aggressively, causing Asherman's syndrome, which resulted in a miscarriage in 2004 and an ectopic pregnancy later that same year.

The physician argued that the placenta was properly inspected and that there was no reason to suspect a retained placental fragment at the time of the delivery. She also claimed that the D&C was properly performed and that retained placental fragments are a recognized complication of delivery and that uterine scarring is a recognized complication of a D&C. A defense verdict was returned.