Robotics may not improve hysterectomy outcomes

October 3, 2013

A new retrospective study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology shows that robotics don’t improve benign hysterectomy outcomes and, in fact, increase cost of the surgery.

 

A new retrospective study published in Obstetrics & Gynecology shows that robotics don’t improve benign hysterectomy outcomes and, in fact, increase cost of the surgery.

The retrospective research-one of the first such nationwide studies-was derived from analysis of data in an insurance database.  Information on surgical outcomes in more than 15,000 women who underwent minimally invasive benign hysterectomies from 2009 to 2010 was included. Half the patients had a robotic-assisted procedure and the other had conventional laparoscopy.

Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center found that complication rates were comparable for robotic (8.80%) versus conventional laparoscopic procedures (8.85%) Patients undergoing robotic hysterectomy were less likely to need a blood transfusion than those undergoing laparoscopy (P<.001), but more likely to have postoperative pneumonia (P=.005).  Compared with laparoscopic hysterectomy, the cost of a robotic procedure averaged $2,489 more.

The authors note the need for more research on robotics, including the impact of the surgeon’s training on outcomes and longer-term patient follow-up on the procedures. 

 

Be to sure to check out our special tech section in the October issue of Contemporary OB/GYN.

 

 

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