Unfractionated heparin may cause higher surgical risks for women

Article

Women undergoing surgery who are treated with unfractionated heparin have a high incidence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), according to a report in the Nov. 1 issue of Blood.

Women undergoing surgery who are treated with unfractionated heparin have a high incidence of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), according to a report in the Nov. 1 issue of Blood. The risk from low-molecular-weight heparin is minimal, regardless of treatment setting.

Theodore E. Warkentin, MD, of McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and colleagues noticed a high incidence of HIT in women after cardiac or orthopedic surgery, according to national databases. In this study, they set out to examine the link more closely using prospective studies comparing unfractionated heparin with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH).

Three separate studies showed overrepresentation of women with HIT. Analysis of the data showed that HIT was more likely to occur in women than men (common OR, 2.37) and in surgical versus medical patients (common OR, 3.25). Unfractionated heparin was also much more likely to cause HIT than LMWH in women versus men (common OR, 9.22 vs. 1.83) and in surgical versus medical patients (common OR, 13.93 vs. 1.75).

Warkentin TE, Sheppard JI, Sigouin CS, et al. Gender imbalance and risk factor interactions in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia. Blood. 2006;108:2937-2941.

Related Videos
One year out: Fezolinetant displays patient satisfaction for managing hot flashes | Image Credit: sutterhealth.org
Addressing maternal health inequities: Insights from CDC's Wanda Barfield | Image Credit: cdc.gov
Addressing racial and ethnic disparities in brachial plexus birth Injury | Image Credit: shrinerschildrens.org
Innovations in prenatal care: Insights from ACOG 2024 | Image Credit:  uofmhealth.org.
Unlocking therapeutic strategies for menopausal cognitive decline | Image Credit: uclahealth.org.
Navigating menopause care: Expert insights from ACOG 2024 | Image Credit: mayo.edu.
raanan meyer, md
Related Content
© 2024 MJH Life Sciences

All rights reserved.