CRP level not helpful in predicting breast cancer

October 1, 2007

While researchers have surmised that chronic inflammation is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer, a recent study suggests that baseline plasma C-reactive protein (CRP)-a marker of systemic inflammation-is not associated with an increased risk for the disease in otherwise healthy women.

While researchers have surmised that chronic inflammation is associated with an increased risk for breast cancer, a recent study suggests that baseline plasma C-reactive protein (CRP)-a marker of systemic inflammation-is not associated with an increased risk for the disease in otherwise healthy women.

Researchers included almost 28,000 healthy women aged 45 years and older participating in the Women's Health Study. During a mean follow-up of 10 years, almost 900 women developed invasive breast cancer; however, baseline plasma CRP level was not associated with breast cancer risk (highest vs. lowest quintile of CRP, multivariable HR 0.90; 95% CI, 0.71–1.16; P=0.19).

Zhang SM, Lin J, Cook NR, et al. C-reactive protein and risk of breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007;99:890-894.