HCP Live
Contagion LiveCGT LiveNeurology LiveHCP LiveOncology LiveContemporary PediatricsContemporary OBGYNEndocrinology NetworkPractical CardiologyRheumatology Netowrk

The world of the pediatric adolescent patient

Contemporary OB/GYN Journal, Vol 67 No 6, Volume 67, Issue 6

This month we focus on pediatric adolescent gynecologic topics, which are critical to our practices (and our families).

It’s a growing specialty within our field and often is underappreciated.

In this issue, you’ll find articles (some of which are detailed below) on gynecologic care for the adolescent, including care of the transgender adolescent patient, common pediatric vulvar conditions, the second part of our pediatric adolescent gynecologic emergencies series, and more.

We tapped experts in the field to address these topics and—appreciating the political nature of some—worked to ensure that the data and expertise were shared across the specialty to provide the best possible coverage.

Appointments specifically for adolescent gynecology are limited in
many areas of the US. As we provide coverage for these needs and topics,
it is essential that we communicate the importance of addressing
concerns, as well as critical support, for the adolescent going through a
medical situation.

Care for transgender patients may need to extend beyond the medical scenario if their care is affected by political agendas. It is vital for obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) to advocate for the care of our patients and ensure appropriate, evidence-based care.

Pediatric vulvar conditions are often hidden, unrecognized, or unacknowledged. Our advocacy to ensure they are evaluated and addressed is critical.

Adolescent gynecologic care may be provided through pediatric adolescent medicine clinics or ob-gyn adolescent gynecology clinics (after subspecialty training). It is vital to ensure appropriate expertise, interest, and support are provided.

Ultimately for the ob-gyn, these individuals are the future of our
field, and providing the best care now ensures a bright future for the patient population.

Catherine Y. Spong, MD,editor in chief, is professor and chair in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. She holds the Gillette Professorship of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Email her at cspong@mjhlifesciences.com.